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Fruit Leather
Posted: August 26, 2016
Did you know the Hunzikuts (citizens of Hunza) were among the first to use fruit leather? Savvy people they must be, because delectable, chewy fruit leather is a nutritious treat that travels great (no crumbles to get on the car seats!) It's easy to make, too.
Active Time
20 minutes
Total Time
8 hours

Ingredients:

  • Fruit (see author's note)
  • Honey, maple syrup or agave

Directions:

  1. 1. Wash and prepare fruit by removing any pits, cores, heavy skin, etc., and cutting away any bruised or spoiled portions, then puree.
  2. 2. Tasting the puree will tell you whether to add sweetener -- most fruits need none, but you can use honey, maple syrup or agave (honey and maple syrup will overpower some fruits). If required, add sweetener and re-taste, repeating as necessary.
  3. 3. Pour onto fruit leather sheets. If your sheets don't have a raised edge, leave enough room (usually about an inch) to allow for spreading during drying.
  4. 4. Dry until it feels leathery and is pliable, with no wet or sticky spots (usually 6 to 8 hours).
  5. 5. Remove from the tray while it's still warm, then cut and roll up. (It rolls best while still warm.)
  6. 6. Wrap individual rolls in plastic wrap, label with date and flavor, and store in a plastic bag or sealed container. To keep longer than a week or two, store in freezer

Author's Notes:

Most berries are great candidates, as are cherries, apples, apricots, kiwi, nectarines, peaches, pears, pineapples and strawberries. In combination with those you can also use blueberries, citrus, dates, figs, guavas, papayas, rhubarb, bananas, grapes and plums. The possibilities are endless!

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Fruit Leather

  • Prep
    20 minutes
  • Total Time
    8 hours

Description

"Did you know the Hunzikuts (citizens of Hunza) were among the first to use fruit leather? Savvy people they must be, because delectable, chewy fruit leather is a nutritious treat that travels great (no crumbles to get on the car seats!) It's easy to make, too. "

Ingredients

  • Fruit (see author's note)
  • Honey, maple syrup or agave

Directions

  1. 1. Wash and prepare fruit by removing any pits, cores, heavy skin, etc., and cutting away any bruised or spoiled portions, then puree.
  2. 2. Tasting the puree will tell you whether to add sweetener -- most fruits need none, but you can use honey, maple syrup or agave (honey and maple syrup will overpower some fruits). If required, add sweetener and re-taste, repeating as necessary.
  3. 3. Pour onto fruit leather sheets. If your sheets don't have a raised edge, leave enough room (usually about an inch) to allow for spreading during drying.
  4. 4. Dry until it feels leathery and is pliable, with no wet or sticky spots (usually 6 to 8 hours).
  5. 5. Remove from the tray while it's still warm, then cut and roll up. (It rolls best while still warm.)
  6. 6. Wrap individual rolls in plastic wrap, label with date and flavor, and store in a plastic bag or sealed container. To keep longer than a week or two, store in freezer

Author's Notes

Most berries are great candidates, as are cherries, apples, apricots, kiwi, nectarines, peaches, pears, pineapples and strawberries. In combination with those you can also use blueberries, citrus, dates, figs, guavas, papayas, rhubarb, bananas, grapes and plums. The possibilities are endless!

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