Pleasant Hill Grain

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Posted: July 9, 2018
Recipe by: Pleasant Hill Grain
This is our basic 100% whole wheat bread recipe for the Bosch Universal mixer… A starting-point for the infinite variety of breads and other foods you can prepare with the world's finest and most complete kitchen center! The recipe makes 8 loaves; dough for up to 9 loaves can be mixed in the Universal mixer by scaling-up this recipe. Mixer can also make as little as a 1-loaf batch. Pleasant Hill Grain includes bread recipes for 1, 2, 4, 5 and 8 loaves with the Bosch Universal.
Active Time
30 minutes
Total Time
1 hour and 30 minutes
Yields
8 loaves

Ingredients:

  • 8-1/2 c. hot tap water (at 115° F)
  • 12 c. “step A” whole wheat flour
  • 1 c. oil (we use grapeseed)
  • 3/4 c. honey (or 1/2 c. agave)
  • 1/2 c. gluten (optional)
  • 3 T. dough enhancer
  • 6 T. SAF yeast
  • 6 c. “step B” whole wheat flour
  • 3 T. sea salt
  • Up to 4 cups "Step C" whole wheat flour

Directions:

  1. 1. With dough hook in Bosch bowl, pour in hot water. Add the “Step A” quantity of freshly ground whole wheat flour, then the oil, honey, gluten, dough enhancer and yeast. With splash ring installed, jog switch to “Pulse” a few times to prevent splashing, then mix well on Speed 2.
  2. 2. Stop and add the “Step B” quantity of flour & add salt on top. Turn on to Speed 2 and within about 1 minute, gradually sprinkle in more flour until the sides of the bowl come mostly clean. This final amount of flour required depends on the humidity of the air and the protein content of the wheat. (Don’t take too long to sprinkle in this final flour, because mixing too long will cause gluten breakdown which produces very sticky dough, and dense bread). Notes: It’s better to add slightly too little flour than too much; your bread will be lighter. The sound of the Bosch motor will become deeper and the tone will rise and fall somewhat after you’ve added most of the flour. This is normal. If you use flour from the fridge or freezer, let it warm to room temp. before using. If using freshly milled flour, let it cool to room temp. before using.
  3. 3. After bowl sides come clean, remove splash ring and knead on Speed 2 until gluten is developed, generally 3-5 minutes for small batches, and 7-10 minutes for large batches. (If using white flour kneading time for gluten development may be much shorter). Gluten development is checked by pulling off a golf-ball sized piece of dough with oiled hands and slowly stretching 2-3 inches between fingers. Gluten is fully developed when you can stretch dough to translucent thinness without tearing. If it tears very easily, knead longer. Gluten will develop faster if your wheat has exceptionally good protein content. Finished dough will have a soft sheen. If over-kneaded, it becomes stringy and bread texture will suffer.
  4. 4. When gluten is developed, pour dough out on a greased surface. Shape dough into a circle and divide, by cross-cutting, into equal pieces (a dough divider is perfect for this). Two loaves’ worth makes a 9” x 13” pan of cinnamon rolls. Loaf pans 8” x 4-1/2” give a nice rounded top.
  5. 5. Shape the loaves by hand or by rolling out. To roll out, used a greased pin on a greased surface and roll to 8" x 16". Then, starting at the far end, roll up tightly in a spiral like you would cinnamon rolls. Tuck each end under, and slam dough down (really hard!) on the counter a couple times to eliminate air bubbles between layers of dough. Put in greased pans.
  6. 6. Cover and let rise in warm, draft-free place until volume doubles (about 25 minutes).
  7. 7. Bake 30-35 min. at 350° F until top is nicely browned, the loaf slides out of the pan, the loaf makes a hollow sound when tapped in the middle of the bottom, and a thermometer inserted into the bread registers 200° F.
  8. 8. Cool on racks. Don’t store in plastic bags until fully cooled. Freeze the extra loaves in bags.

Author's Notes:

Batch size given in number of loaves is based on use of 3” x 4-1/2” x 8” loaf pans, and a loaf weight of about 1-1/2 lbs. This 8-loaf batch will weigh about 13 lbs. and will mound up far above the open bowl-top when kneading. Up to 15 lbs. of dough can be mixed in the Bosch Universal mixer by scaling-up the recipe. At PHG we use half spelt flour and half Kamut flour in our whole grain bread. The gluten develops beautifully with this combination of grains, and the flavor is great!

Images:

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves
Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves

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Comments

Elizabeth Mennemeyer

commented on October 15, 2018 at 5:07pm
I have tried at least 8 different recipe variations for the Bosch, in various sizes, trying to get the right ratios for maximizing the Bosch capabilities while using freshly milled flour. This recipe far exceeds the rest. I'm very pleased to find the right combination of ingredients, but what sets this recipe above and beyond is all the little hints and specific details. If you're new to your Bosch, skip the recipes that are in the booklet or that came with a different merchandiser. Go straight to the Pleasant Hill Grain Recipe and save yourself the trouble. I wish I had discovered it sooner!

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Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread for Bosch Universal — 8 Loaves

  • Prep
    30 minutes
  • Total Time
    1 hour and 30 minutes
  • Yields
    8 loaves

Description

"This is our basic 100% whole wheat bread recipe for the Bosch Universal mixer… A starting-point for the infinite variety of breads and other foods you can prepare with the world's finest and most complete kitchen center! The recipe makes 8 loaves; dough for up to 9 loaves can be mixed in the Universal mixer by scaling-up this recipe. Mixer can also make as little as a 1-loaf batch. Pleasant Hill Grain includes bread recipes for 1, 2, 4, 5 and 8 loaves with the Bosch Universal."

Ingredients

  • 8-1/2 c. hot tap water (at 115° F)
  • 12 c. “step A” whole wheat flour
  • 1 c. oil (we use grapeseed)
  • 3/4 c. honey (or 1/2 c. agave)
  • 1/2 c. gluten (optional)
  • 3 T. dough enhancer
  • 6 T. SAF yeast
  • 6 c. “step B” whole wheat flour
  • 3 T. sea salt
  • Up to 4 cups "Step C" whole wheat flour

Directions

  1. 1. With dough hook in Bosch bowl, pour in hot water. Add the “Step A” quantity of freshly ground whole wheat flour, then the oil, honey, gluten, dough enhancer and yeast. With splash ring installed, jog switch to “Pulse” a few times to prevent splashing, then mix well on Speed 2.
  2. 2. Stop and add the “Step B” quantity of flour & add salt on top. Turn on to Speed 2 and within about 1 minute, gradually sprinkle in more flour until the sides of the bowl come mostly clean. This final amount of flour required depends on the humidity of the air and the protein content of the wheat. (Don’t take too long to sprinkle in this final flour, because mixing too long will cause gluten breakdown which produces very sticky dough, and dense bread). Notes: It’s better to add slightly too little flour than too much; your bread will be lighter. The sound of the Bosch motor will become deeper and the tone will rise and fall somewhat after you’ve added most of the flour. This is normal. If you use flour from the fridge or freezer, let it warm to room temp. before using. If using freshly milled flour, let it cool to room temp. before using.
  3. 3. After bowl sides come clean, remove splash ring and knead on Speed 2 until gluten is developed, generally 3-5 minutes for small batches, and 7-10 minutes for large batches. (If using white flour kneading time for gluten development may be much shorter). Gluten development is checked by pulling off a golf-ball sized piece of dough with oiled hands and slowly stretching 2-3 inches between fingers. Gluten is fully developed when you can stretch dough to translucent thinness without tearing. If it tears very easily, knead longer. Gluten will develop faster if your wheat has exceptionally good protein content. Finished dough will have a soft sheen. If over-kneaded, it becomes stringy and bread texture will suffer.
  4. 4. When gluten is developed, pour dough out on a greased surface. Shape dough into a circle and divide, by cross-cutting, into equal pieces (a dough divider is perfect for this). Two loaves’ worth makes a 9” x 13” pan of cinnamon rolls. Loaf pans 8” x 4-1/2” give a nice rounded top.
  5. 5. Shape the loaves by hand or by rolling out. To roll out, used a greased pin on a greased surface and roll to 8" x 16". Then, starting at the far end, roll up tightly in a spiral like you would cinnamon rolls. Tuck each end under, and slam dough down (really hard!) on the counter a couple times to eliminate air bubbles between layers of dough. Put in greased pans.
  6. 6. Cover and let rise in warm, draft-free place until volume doubles (about 25 minutes).
  7. 7. Bake 30-35 min. at 350° F until top is nicely browned, the loaf slides out of the pan, the loaf makes a hollow sound when tapped in the middle of the bottom, and a thermometer inserted into the bread registers 200° F.
  8. 8. Cool on racks. Don’t store in plastic bags until fully cooled. Freeze the extra loaves in bags.

Author's Notes

Batch size given in number of loaves is based on use of 3” x 4-1/2” x 8” loaf pans, and a loaf weight of about 1-1/2 lbs. This 8-loaf batch will weigh about 13 lbs. and will mound up far above the open bowl-top when kneading. Up to 15 lbs. of dough can be mixed in the Bosch Universal mixer by scaling-up the recipe. At PHG we use half spelt flour and half Kamut flour in our whole grain bread. The gluten develops beautifully with this combination of grains, and the flavor is great!

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