Pleasant Hill Grain

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Pleasant Hill Grain Baking Glossary

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Tapioca – A powdery starch derived from the cassava root. Tapioca is native to Brazil and spread to other South American countries from there. It is now produced worldwide. Tapioca mostly contains carbohydrates and it has no significant amount of vitamins or minerals. Tapioca starch (also called tapioca flour) is gluten-free and is often used in gluten-free baking. Tapioca starch can also be used as a thickening agent for sauces, soups, puddings, pies and more. (See our organic tapioca starch.)

Three Phase Power (also 3-Phase, 3-PH) – Three phase is the type of electric power typically used in industrial sites as well as in commercial sites where motors constitute a substantial portion of the electrical load. (By contrast, U.S. homes as well as many commercial sites having only small motor usage are supplied with single phase power.) Electric motors are made to operate on either single phase or three phase power (not interchangeably).

Transformer – Transformers are used to change the voltage of electric power, and are found within many appliances. Special transformers also are sold as standalone devices, to make it possible to use appliances that were built for the voltage available in one country (220 volts, for example) usable in a different country (a country having 120 volt power, for example). Such transformers, however, cannot modify the power's frequency (expressed in Hertz) and therefore are not suitable for all appliances, some of which are frequency-specific.

Triticale – (Pronounced tri-tə-ˈkā-lē) A protein-rich hybrid grain developed from wheat and rye to combine the baking quality and high crop yield of wheat with the hardiness of rye for environmental and disease tolerance. The name is a combination of the Latin words for wheat and rye which are triticum and secale, respectively. Most triticale is used as livestock feed, but some is used for baking for human consumption. (See our non-GMO organic triticale.)

Toasting Nuts – To toast nuts for a healthy snack or to incorporate into a recipe, heat the nuts at a medium to medium-high heat for a few minutes in a single layer in the oven, on the stove, or in the microwave. Toasting nuts releases their aromatic oil, gives them a stronger flavor, and crisp exterior. The best way to tell when the nuts are toasted is by their scent. When you can smell the strong nut-scent, they’re ready.

Turbinado Sugar – This is a refined sugar (though not as refined as white sugar) that’s been heated, clarified, dehydrated, and had some of its molasses content added back in. Turbinado sugar has a small amount of the vitamins and nutrients found in whole cane sugar. The color of Turbinado is slightly lighter than that of brown sugar. The granules of Turbinado are rather large, and won’t dissolve easily, making Turbinado a desirable decorative topping for some cookies, pastries and quick breads.

Page:
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
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